FSU SERUM

Non-Stim Pre-Workout
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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

The FSU formula is pretty simple, but very powerful, featuring mostly liquid glycerol alongside a potent amount of nitrate. And that's exactly what makes it special.


Loaded with a whopping 20 grams of GlycoClear glycerol, 2 grams of betaine nitrate, and boosted by sodium and potassium electrolytes, our FSU Serum is designed to hyperhydrate your cells, pump your muscles, and get you ready to conquer the toughest workout sessions.

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout
$44.99$44.99
LSD [LEMON STRAWBERRY DREAM]GALAXY POP [BOMB POPSICLE]SOUR RAINBOW [SOUR CANDY]ISLAND VIBES [PINEBERRY COCONUT]

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For years, Inspired Nutraceuticals has forged a path – a break in a sea of thousands of copycat formulas with dubious quality and efficacy. By honing in on what actually works – and ruthlessly tinkering with it – Inspired Nutra is the purveyor of edge when it comes to athletic supplementation.


There are a lot of components involved in putting in intense hours at the gym, week after week. Two of these components are hydration and pump. 

THE ULTIMATE PUMP ELIXER

If you’ve been lifting weights for a while, you’re no doubt familiar with the feeling of a good pump. Once you’ve felt it once, you can’t forget it. You can’t stop chasing that feeling of total power and domination.


With muscles bulging and veins nearly popping out of your skin, you feel like you can lift a mountain. When the pump comes, a glorious, focused intensity soon follows. 


Triggering a reliable, powerful pump is a Herculean task, and we are pleased to announce that we’ve finally killed our Cerberus.


FLOOD YOUR MUSCLES

The first key is simple: water. 


In fact, it’s so simple, it’s beautiful. Whether you’re a cowboy whippin’ cattle down a dusty sonoran trail or an avid bodybuilder, you know the necessity of proper hydration.


But proper hydration doesn’t just help with cotton-mouth. Water is the wellspring of life, all the way down to each individual cell. This is the secret to the almighty pump. Once your cells are not just hydrated, but hyper-hydrated, the ripple effects cascade all the way to your muscles, making them swell.

THE FSU SERUM:
20 GRAMS OF ACTUAL GLYCEROL

FSU Serum is here from the sorcerers at Inspired Nutraceuticals, and not a moment too soon. Far from being a merely aesthetic boon, getting a gnarly pump improves results. From enhanced performance to faster recovery, pump-inducing supplements are built to take training to the next level.


Every major athletic supplement brand on the market is getting into the pump game, utilizing ingredients like nitrates, betaine, and – of course – glycerol.


Beyond achieving results, the other side of a successful supplement is consumability. Glycerol is notoriously difficult to work with in powdered form. In order to avoid clumping, nearly all glycerol supplements on the market need to cram in loads of silica.


As a result, most products are so diluted that they fail to meet the studied and efficacious dosages of glycerol required for that pristine pump. FSU has solved this problem in the form of liquid glycerol. The dose is loaded and it's only the start of this formula.

THE FSU SERUM FORMULA

  • LSD
  • GALAXY POP
  • SOUR RAINBOW
  • ISLAND VIBES

Other Ingredients: Filtered Water, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Sucralose

LSD 

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout
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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

LSD 

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

$44.99$44.99

Other Ingredients: Filtered Water, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Sucralose

Galaxy Pop 

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout
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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

Galaxy Pop 

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

$44.99$44.99

Other Ingredients: Filtered Water, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Sucralose

Sour Rainbow 

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout
Sale Off
FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

Sale Off
FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

Sour Rainbow 

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

$44.99$44.99

Other Ingredients: Filtered Water, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Sucralose

island vibes 

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FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout
Sale Off
FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

Sale Off
FSU: Serum Non-Stim Pre-Workout

island vibes 

SWEETNESS

SOURNESS

$44.99$44.99

THE FSU SERUM FORMULA

The FSU formula is pretty simple, but very powerful, featuring mostly liquid glycerol alongside a potent amount of nitrate. And that's exactly what makes it special.


Nearly every glycerol product on the market is forced to compromise on the amount of glycerol to make room for silica – because silica prevents clumping… sometimes. As most of us have discovered, glycerol supplements often still clump! We don’t need to make that compromise.


Loaded with a whopping 20 grams of GlycoClear glycerol, 2 grams of betaine nitrate, and boosted by sodium and potassium electrolytes, our FSU Serum is designed to hyperhydrate your cells, pump your muscles, and get you ready to conquer the toughest workout sessions.

Hyperhydrate your cells with glycerol

FSU Serum contains a whopping 20 grams of glycerol to ensure your cells are hyperhydrated, so long as you keep enough water around. This helps improve nutrient availability, performance, thermal resistance, and recovery. Plus, the massive dosage we've included is a huge advantage of going liquid over powder-based supplements.


Glycerol, a natural byproduct of fatty acid and glucose metabolism,[1,2] is commonly used in our bodies to create glucose in a process known as gluconeogenesis.[3] It's distributed to almost all tissues in the body, where it helps regulate water balance in cells by manipulating extracellular osmotic pressure.[4]


But the real magic happens when we supplement more of it.


The above process can cause cells to become hyperhydrated due to an influx of water, and adding more glycerol to the diet can provide athletic benefits such as increased thermal resistance, improved nutrient availability, better performance, and faster recovery.[5] Especially when it's taken with plenty of water.


And that's not the only hydrating ingredient inside:

Feel the surge with betaine nitrate

Betaine, also known as trimethylglycine (TMG), is an ergogenic aid that enhances athletic performance.[6] It's a methyl donor involved in several metabolic processes, including the regulation of blood homocysteine levels, which can affect cardiovascular health if too high. Therefore, supplementing with betaine can boost immediate performance and contribute to long-term cardiovascular health.[7,8]


Similar to glycerol, betaine also acts as an osmolyte, maintaining optimal cell hydration [7-9] and providing protection against heat stress.[10] Long-term supplementation of higher doses of betaine (2.5 to 5 grams daily) can significantly improve strength, power, endurance, and body composition.[11-16]


The real synergy becomes apparent with betaine’s marriage to nitric acid, or nitrate, to form betaine nitrate. Nitrate is converted to nitrite, at which point it finds its way to your salivary glands, where it is converted into nitric oxide.[17-19] Nitric oxide is ground zero for a good pump, due to its role in promoting vasodilation.


Nitrate supplementation has been shown to increase circulation,[20] improve aerobic capacity,[20-23] speed up recovery, and prolong endurance.[22-23]


We have a solid 2,000mg of Betaine Nitrate in each tablespoon of FSU Serum. When choosing a hydrating pump ingredient to go alongside our huge amount of glycerol, betaine nitrate is the primo pick.

Don't Forget Your Electrolytes!

We didn’t forget the gold standards for hydration: sodium and potassium. Both play a crucial role in ensuring your muscle contractions are efficient and forceful. Avid athletes know how essential it is to replenish these crucial electrolytes post a sweaty workout, and our FSU Serum is here to ensure you do just that.


Sodium (500mg) is essential for peak athletic performance as it is one of the electrolyte minerals necessary for efficient muscle contractions.[24] Intense workouts can deplete the body of sodium through sweating, impacting performance and recovery if not replenished.[25] Current research suggests that higher sodium intake, within the range of 3,000 mg to 5,000 mg per day,[26] may not be as harmful as previously thought, especially for athletes or individuals who sweat a lot.


Potassium (250mg), another vital electrolyte, also plays a crucial role in cardiovascular health[27] and helps the body retain calcium.[28-29] The sodium to potassium ratio might be more critical than the absolute intake of either,[30,31] with low sodium-to-potassium ratios linked to hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.[32-37] Therefore, it is advised to increase potassium intake instead of just reducing sodium. 


Finally, maintaining adequate potassium levels is necessary for vasodilation as the interaction between sodium and potassium drives this process through the polarization of endothelial cells.[32,38,39]

Hardcore muscular hydration with clinical doses of glycerol

FSU Serum is a revolution in pre-workout pump technology, designed to drive hydration straight to your muscles. When combined with plenty of water, prepare yourself to blow up like a nuclear-grade mushroom cloud.


The big secret about glycerol supplements is that the vast majority of them do not meet the dosages cited in the literature on glycerol. If you want the evidence-backed, muscle-engorging effects of glycerol, you need to be taking a lot.


This is simply not conducive to powder supplementation. Enter FSU Serum: liquid pumps that are worth their weight in dumbbells.


At the end of the day, the more water your cells have to work with, the more they swell, the more endurance you have, and the more muscular volume you’ll achieve. This can only mean one thing:


More gains.

Customer Reviews

Based on 24 reviews
88%
(21)
8%
(2)
4%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
S
Shawn

Amazing product and fast shipping 🔥

N
Nicholas Cerulla

FSU Serum reviews

J
Jett

Best pump ever hands down have you feeling like hulk

J
Jose O.
Love the product.

It’s easy to get caught up in the routine and that can affect the overall workout, but this changed it up in a big way and created a new level of excitement. Looking forward to seeing the progress!

A
Arturo S.
Another amazing product from Inspired!

Another amazing product from Inspired! Amazing taste and even better pumps! Definitely recommend!!!

REFERENCES

  1. Simon P V R, Mark A O, Robert G F,et al; Nutrition reviews; 2009; 67(12; 690-705;

  2. Baba, H et al; “Glycerol gluconeogenesis in fasting humans.”; Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.); vol. 11,2; 1995; 149-53; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7647479/

  3. Ross, B D et al; “The rate of gluconeogenesis from various precursors in the perfused rat liver.”; The Biochemical journal; vol. 102,3; 1967; 942-51; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1270348/

  4. Patlar, Suleyman et al; “The effect of glycerol supplements on aerobic and anaerobic performance of athletes and sedentary subjects.”; Journal of human kinetics; vol. 34; 2012; 69-79; doi:10.2478/v10078-012-0065-x; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3590833/

  5. Patlar, Suleyman et al; “The effect of glycerol supplements on aerobic and anaerobic performance of athletes and sedentary subjects.”; Journal of human kinetics; vol. 34; 2012; 69-79; doi:10.2478/v10078-012-0065-x; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3590833/

  6. Thein, L A et al. “Ergogenic aids.” Physical therapy vol. 75,5 (1995): 426-39. doi:10.1093/ptj/75.5.426 https://academic.oup.com/ptj/article-abstract/75/5/426/2632902?redirectedFrom=fulltext&login=false

  7. Cholewa, Jason M et al. “Effects of betaine on body composition, performance, and homocysteine thiolactone.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition vol. 10,1 39. 22 Aug. 2013, doi:10.1186/1550-2783-10-39; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3844502/

  8. Prasad K. Homocysteine, a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease. Int J Angiol. 1999 Jan;8(1):76-86. doi: 10.1007/BF01616850; https://www.thieme-connect.de/products/ejournals/abstract/10.1007/BF01616850

  9. Boel De Paepe; “Osmolytes as Mediators of the Muscle Tissue’s Responses to Inflammation: Emerging Regulators of Myositis with Therapeutic Potential”; EMJ Rheumatol. 2017;4[4]:83-89; https://www.emjreviews.com/rheumatology/article/osmolytes-as-mediators-of-the-muscle-tissues-responses-to-inflammation-emerging-regulators-of-myositis-with-therapeutic-potential/

  10. Caldas, Teresa, et al. “Thermoprotection by Glycine Betaine and Choline.” Microbiology, vol. 145, no. 9, 1 Sept. 1999, pp. 2543–2548, 10.1099/00221287-145-9-2543; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10517607/

  11. Roti, M; “Homocysteine, Lipid and Glucose Responses to Betaine Supplementation During Running in the Heat”; Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2003 – Volume 35 – Issue 5 – p S271; https://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2003/05001/HOMOCYSTEINE,_LIPID_AND_GLUCOSE_RESPONSES_TO.1501.aspx

  12. Armstrong, Lawrence E, et al. “Influence of Betaine Consumption on Strenuous Running and Sprinting in a Hot Environment.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 22, no. 3, May 2008, pp. 851–860, 10.1519/jsc.0b013e31816a6efb; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18438230

  13. Hoffman, Jay R, et al. “Effect of Betaine Supplementation on Power Performance and Fatigue.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 6, no. 1, 27 Feb. 2009, 10.1186/1550-2783-6-7; https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-6-7

  14. Lee, Elaine C, et al. “Ergogenic Effects of Betaine Supplementation on Strength and Power Performance.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 7, no. 1, 2010, p. 27, 10.1186/1550-2783-7-27; https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-7-27

  15. Trepanowski, John F, et al. “The Effects of Chronic Betaine Supplementation on Exercise Performance, Skeletal Muscle Oxygen Saturation and Associated Biochemical Parameters in Resistance Trained Men.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 25, no. 12, Dec. 2011, pp. 3461–3471, 10.1519/jsc.0b013e318217d48d; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22080324/

  16. Pryor, J Luke, et al. “Effect of Betaine Supplementation on Cycling Sprint Performance.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, vol. 9, no. 1, 3 Apr. 2012, 10.1186/1550-2783-9-12; https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-9-12

  17. Lundberg, Jon O., and Mirco Govoni. “Inorganic Nitrate Is a Possible Source for Systemic Generation of Nitric Oxide.” Free Radical Biology & Medicine, vol. 37, no. 3, 1 Aug. 2004, pp. 395–400, 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2004.04.027. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15223073/

  18. Qu, X. M., et al. “From Nitrate to Nitric Oxide: The Role of Salivary Glands and Oral Bacteria.” Journal of Dental Research, vol. 95, no. 13, 1 Dec. 2016, pp. 1452–1456, 10.1177/0022034516673019; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27872324/

  19. Eisenbrand, G., et al. “Nitrate and Nitrite in Saliva.” Oncology, vol. 37, no. 4, 1980, pp. 227–231, 10.1159/000225441; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7443155/

  20. Larsen, F; “Effects of dietary nitrate on oxygen cost during exercise”; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet; 2007; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17635415/

  21. Lansley, K; “Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces the O2 cost of walking and running: a placebo-controlled study”; School of Sport and Health Sciences, Univ. of Exeter; 2011; https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.01070.2010

  22. Bailey, S; “Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces the O2 cost of low-intensity exercise and enhances tolerance to high-intensity exercise in humans”; School of Sport and Health Sciences, Univ. of Exeter; 2009; https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.00722.2009

  23. Bescos, R; “Acute administration of inorganic nitrate reduces VO(2peak) in endurance athletes”; National Institute of Physical Education-Barcelona, University of Barcelona; 2011; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21407132/

  24. Strazzullo P., Leclercq C.; “Sodium.” Advanced Nutrition; March 2014; 5(2) 188-190; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3951800/

  25. Valentine, V. 2007. “The Importance of Salt in the Athlete’s Diet.” Current Sports Medicine Reports vol. 6,4 (2007): 237-40. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17617999/

  26. O’Donnell M, Mente A, Yusuf S. Sodium intake and cardiovascular health. Circ Res. 2015 Mar 13;116(6):1046-57. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.303771; https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.303771

  27. Weaver, Connie M. “Potassium and Health.” Advances in Nutrition, vol. 4, no. 3, 1 May 2013, pp. 368S377S, 10.3945/an.112.003533; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3650509/

  28. Lemann, Jacob, et al. “Potassium Administration Increases and Potassium Deprivation Reduces Urinary Calcium Excretion in Healthy Adults.” Kidney International, vol. 39, no. 5, May 1991, pp. 973–983, 10.1038/ki.1991.123; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1648646/

  29. Gregory, Naina Sinha, et al. “Potassium Citrate Decreases Bone Resorption in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial” Endocrine Practice, vol. 21, no. 12, Dec. 2015, pp. 1380–1386, 10.4158/ep15738.or; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC5558825/

  30. Fulgoni, Victor L., et al. “Foods, Fortificants, and Supplements: Where Do Americans Get Their Nutrients?” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 141, no. 10, 24 Aug. 2011, pp. 1847–1854, 10.3945/jn.111.142257; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3174857/

  31. Cook, Nancy R. “Joint Effects of Sodium and Potassium Intake on Subsequent Cardiovascular Disease.” Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 169, no. 1, 12 Jan. 2009, p. 32, 10.1001/archinternmed.2008.523; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC2629129/

  32. Adrogué, Horacio J., and Nicolaos E. Madias. “Sodium and Potassium in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension.” New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 356, no. 19, 10 May 2007, pp. 1966–1978, 10.1056/nejmra064486; https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17494929/

  33. Dyer, Alan R., et al. “Urinary Electrolyte Excretion in 24 Hours and Blood Pressure in the INTERSALT Study.” American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 139, no. 9, 1 May 1994, pp. 940–951, 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a117100; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8166144

  34. Elliott, P., et al. “Intersalt Revisited: Further Analyses of 24 Hour Sodium Excretion and Blood Pressure within and across Populations.” BMJ, vol. 312, no. 7041, 18 May 1996, pp. 1249–1253, www.bmj.com/content/312/7041/1249, 10.1136/bmj.312.7041.1249; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC2351086/

  35. Cook, N. R., et al. “Effect of Change in Sodium Excretion on Change in Blood Pressure Corrected for Measurement Error. The Trials of Hypertension Prevention, Phase I.” American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 148, no. 5, 1 Sept. 1998, pp. 431–444, 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a009668; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9737555

  36. Khaw, K T, and E Barrett-Connor. “The Association between Blood Pressure, Age, and Dietary Sodium and Potassium: A Population Study.” Circulation, vol. 77, no. 1, Jan. 1988, pp. 53–61, 10.1161/01.cir.77.1.53; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3257173

  37. Xie, J. X., et al. “The Relationship between Urinary Cations Obtained from the INTERSALT Study and Cerebrovascular Mortality.” Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 6, no. 1, 1 Feb. 1992, pp. 17–21; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1583625

  38. Haddy, Francis J., et al. “Role of Potassium in Regulating Blood Flow and Blood Pressure.” American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, vol. 290, no. 3, 1 Mar. 2006, pp. R546-552, 10.1152/ajpregu.00491.2005; https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpregu.00491.2005

  39. Amberg, Gregory C., et al. “Modulation of the Molecular Composition of Large Conductance, Ca2+ Activated K+ Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle during Hypertension.” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 112, no. 5, 1 Sept. 2003, p. 717, 10.1172/JCI18684; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC182211/

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